right


right
   Most past and present cultures (perhaps all) contrast the right and *left hand to the advantage of the former, presumably because in most people it is stronger and more skilled; in English, there is also a strong verbal connection with 'right' in the senses 'correct, good'. The right hand symbolizes power, authority, benevolence, honour, and loyalty; it is used in gestures of greeting or blessing, in shaking hands, taking oaths, etc. In the ancient Roman system of augury, omens to the right of the enquirer were favourable. Whatever the origins of these semi-conscious meanings, Christianity strengthened them by some vivid imagery: the risen Christ sits 'at the right hand of the Father', and at the Last Judgement the 'sheep' will be on the right, the 'goats' on the left (Matthew 25: 33).
   In folk beliefs, good luck is regularly associated with the right side: it is lucky to see the new moon to one's right, to put the right stocking or shoe on first, to cross a threshold with the right foot, and so on, while in each case the *left is unlucky.
   See also *left.

A Dictionary of English folklore. . 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • right — / rīt/ n [Old English riht, from riht righteous] 1 a: qualities (as adherence to duty or obedience to lawful authority) that together constitute the ideal of moral propriety or merit moral approval b: something that is morally just able to… …   Law dictionary

  • Right — • Substantive designating the object of justice Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Right     Right     † …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Right — (r[imac]t), a. [OE. right, riht, AS. riht; akin to D. regt, OS. & OHG. reht, G. recht, Dan. ret, Sw. r[ a]tt, Icel. r[ e]ttr, Goth. ra[ i]hts, L. rectus, p. p. of regere to guide, rule; cf. Skr. [.r]ju straight, right. [root]115. Cf.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • right — [rīt] adj. [ME < OE riht, straight, direct, right, akin to Ger recht < IE base * reĝ , straight, stretch out, put in order > RICH, RECKON, L regere, to rule, rex, king, regula, a rule] 1. Obs. not curved; straight: now only in… …   English World dictionary

  • Right — Right, adv. 1. In a right manner. [1913 Webster] 2. In a right or straight line; directly; hence; straightway; immediately; next; as, he stood right before me; it went right to the mark; he came right out; he followed right after the guide. [1913 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Right — Right, n. [AS. right. See {Right}, a.] 1. That which is right or correct. Specifically: (a) The straight course; adherence to duty; obedience to lawful authority, divine or human; freedom from guilt, the opposite of moral wrong. (b) A true… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • right — right, rightly 1. Right is used as an adverb meaning ‘in the right way, in a proper manner’ with a number of verbs, notably do right, go right (as in Nothing went right), guess right, spell something right, treat someone right. In general,… …   Modern English usage

  • right — [adj1] fair, just appropriate, condign, conscientious, deserved, due, equitable, ethical, fitting, good, honest, honorable, justifiable, lawful, legal, legitimate, merited, moral, proper, requisite, righteous, rightful, scrupulous, standup*,… …   New thesaurus

  • right — ► ADJECTIVE 1) on, towards, or relating to the side of a human body or of a thing which is to the east when the person or thing is facing north. 2) morally good, justified, or acceptable. 3) factually correct. 4) most appropriate: the right man… …   English terms dictionary

  • right — adj 1 *good Antonyms: wrong 2 *correct, accurate, exact, precise, nice Analogous words: fitting, proper, meet (see FIT): *decorous, decent, seemly Antonyms: wrong …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Right — Right, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Righted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Righting}.] [AS. rihtan. See {Right}, a.] 1. To bring or restore to the proper or natural position; to set upright; to make right or straight (that which has been wrong or crooked); to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English